FARREP Statewide Planning Meeting

Maria Ibrahim, from North Yarra Community Health; Aisha El-Hag from Doutta Galla Community Health and Wemi Oyekanmi from Mercy Hospital for Women contributed to the Statewide FARREP Planning day at MCWH.

Maria Ibrahim from North Yarra Community Health; Aisha El-Hag from Doutta Galla Community Health and Wemi Oyekanmi from Mercy Hospital for Women at the Statewide FARREP Planning day.

Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health was pleased to host the Family and Reproductive Rights Education Program (FARREP) statewide planning meeting last week. Funded by the Victorian Department of Health, FARREP is the Victorian program that works with communities that are affected by FGM/C. FARREP provides support to women and conducts FGM/C prevention programs with affected communities across the state, creating links to services and improving sexual and reproductive health.

Apart from the obvious pleasure of catching up with old friends, the day was a great opportunity to make better use of our resources by sharing our plans for the year. A series of working groups were established to better share our expertise in providing professional education, school-based programs, community education, direct support to women, and evaluation.

Launch of the Culturally Responsive Palliative Care Community Education project

The Hon. David Davis, Minister for Health with Sir James Gobbo, Patron of Palliative Care Victoria (PCV) and representatives of MCWH, ECCV and Pallitiave Care Victoria.

The Hon. David Davis, Minister for Health with Sir James Gobbo, Patron of Palliative Care Victoria and representatives of MCWH, ECCV and Pallitiave Care Victoria.

MCWH is very pleased to be part of the Culturally Responsive Palliative Care Community Education project, a collaborative project headed by Palliative Care Victoria and launched by the Health Minister, Hon. David Davis. The project will use best practice approaches to raise awareness about palliative care and improve access to palliative care services, focusing on the Chinese, Italian, Maltese, Turkish and Vietnamese communities.

In collaboration with the Ethnic Communities Council of Victoria, MCWH will run around 90 peer education sessions using our bi-lingual educators, as well as raising awareness through ethnic media. The launch was a great success, and MCWH looks forward to working with communities on this issue.

Continuing the Discussion about Feminism

3CR Community Radio has recently broadcast parts of our March seminar ‘Does feminism speak for all women?’

The national women’s current affairs program, Women on the Line, featured discussions from all three of our speakers: Durkhanai Ayubi, a Senior Policy Analyst for the Federal Government; Juliana Qian a writer and media-maker and Dr Odette Kelada a lecturer at the University of Melbourne who researches and publishes on whiteness, race, colonisation and feminism.

You can listen to the broadcast here…

Invitation to Public Forum: ‘Does Feminism Speak for All Women?’

SEMINARFeminism is making a comeback. In Australia, feminism is increasingly becoming a part of pop culture, politics, and a dominant topic in the world of social media. Internationally, struggles by women all over the world are adding to the significance of feminism. Women are reclaiming feminism for a new era and applying it to the context of their lives.

But does feminism today speak for all women?

One of the critiques of feminism is that it does not represent the diversity of women’s experiences, by making sweeping assumptions of what feminism means. In particular, feminism can be seen to disregard the complexities of racialised/gendered identity.

With the resurgence of feminism, now more than ever, it is important to ensure that feminism gets it right.

What areas of feminism need to be challenged to ensure it truly works to further the interests of all women, regardless of background? What would this new feminism look and sound like?

Featuring a panel of 3 amazing young feminists, this not to be missed forum will raise key questions about feminism today.

For tickets and details click here or download the poster

Common Threads Report and Best Practice Guide Launched by Maria Vamvakinou

Member for Calwell Maria Vamvakinou with author Maria Hach, MCWH Chairperson, Repa Patel and Executive Director Adele Murdolo at the Common Threads Launch

Member for Calwell Maria Vamvakinou with author Maria Hach, MCWH Chairperson, Repa Patel and Executive Director Adele Murdolo at the Common Threads Launch

On 4 December the Federal Member for Calwell, Maria Vamvakinou MP, launched the MCWH Common Threads Report and Best Practice Guide in Melbourne. Vamvakinou launched the publications on behalf of the Minister for Health Tanya Plibersek, and spoke passionately about her own experience and years of work with immigrant and refugee communities in her electorate.

The report is the culmination of a national and cross-cultural initiative to understand and articulate the issues, needs, values and experiences of immigrant and refugee women in relation to their sexual and reproductive health.

By focusing on the stories and experiences of women from four different cultural and linguistic groups (Chinese, Indian, Sudanese and Middle Eastern) alongside consultations with key health providers in the field, the Common Threads report is a compelling illustration of why definitions of health must incorporate the social determinants which affect wellbeing: factors such as gender, culture, language, and socio-economic situation. It is equally, a testament to the voices of immigrant and refugee women, and why these voices need to be heard and shared in a national forum.

Because of stories such as those in Common Threads, our new vision for MCWH is to be the national voice for immigrant and refugee women’s wellbeing in Australia.

The Common Threads Report and Best Practice Guide are essential reading for health practitioners working with migrants and refugees.

You can read the full report here …
and you can access the Best Practice Guide here …